Harry F. Legg House, 1601 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Harry F. Legg House

Harry Legg house
Address: 1601 Park
Neighborhood/s: Elliot Park, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennnepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States
Year built: 1887
Primary Style: Queen Anne
Historic Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Current Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Architect or source of design: George H. Hoit
Builder: George H. Hoit
Material of Exterior Wall Covering: Wood
Material of Roof: Shingle
Material of Foundation: Limestone
First Owner: Harry F. Legg

Elliot Park Minneapolis Hennnepin County

Harry F. Legg House, 1601 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota
(44.9671521° N, 93.2650756° WLatitude: 44°58′1.748″N
Longitude: 93°15′54.272″W
)
National Register of Historic Places Information
Reference Number: 76001061
Certification date: June 3, 1976


The Harry Legg house is one of the good surviving examples of the Queen Ann style. The interior is little changed from the original and shows the ornate woodwork that may have been of the made to order or factory catalog.

This building is the Victorian Queen Ann Style and was typical of a middle income professional level. It is of wood frame construction with an exposed base of kasota stone block rising about 3' from ground level.

The front of the house is distinguished by the round northwest corner of the building that continues upward to end in a round tower which rises out of the roof.

The original porch wrapped around the southwest side of the house and the roof was in the form of a flat deck with an ornate 16" railing around the edge. The rear porch,which provided one of two entryways to the kitchen has been entirely removed.

However, the door and window that opened to this porch are still intact and in place. The present roofing is asphalt shingle and from known facts to date is the second roof since the original which was wood shingle with ridge cresting.

The interior layout shows typical Victorian use of space; twin double front doors opening into a vestibule and then the formal entryway in quarter sawed golden oak with a grand staircase to the left, leading to the second floor. The front parlor is to the right through sliding doors and features door and window trim of redwood or cedar with mahogany finish. This room also has a front floor length window with stained glass panels on both sides.

From the front parlor to the back parlor we pass through a large archway. The south wall of this room is curved out, matching the outside of the building. The library is directly behind the back parlor and features cherry wood trim.

The dining room is to the north of the back parlor and is separated by sliding doors. This room is distinguished by the 41 oak paneling on the wall and the oak flooring with an ornate border inlay of walnut and maple in the folded ribbon style.

The butlers pantry has been converted into two baths while the kitchen is changed to the extent that the cookstove chimney is removed and the walls and floors are now covered with modern materials.

The second floor is changed very little. Woodwork is of softwood and is now painted where the original was grained. The bath features a tub with oak top ring on the edge.

The original heating system was some type of hot air but is now a new low pressure steam. Three fireplaces once graced the first floor but are now sealed off. The only operating fireplace left intact is on second floor in the front. The building retains much of its original hardware, layout and charm. It is extremely well constructed at an original cost of $8,050.00 for materials and plumbing and first sold for $16,000.00.

The significance of this house rests in the fact that it is a good example of the type of home that was typical of middle to upper income professional types and clearly represents the social lifestyle of the period.

Harry Legg and his wife Dora were the owners of a jewelry store in downtown Minneapolis.

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Contents


Memories and stories

Photo Gallery

Related Links

City of Minneapolis --- Harry Legg House

Wikipedia --- Harry Legg House

National Register of Historic Places nomination form


Notes

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