Masonic Temple, 307 Chestnut Street, Berea, Kentucky

From Placeography

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(New page: {{Infobox Building |state-province=Kentucky }} {{Location}} {{AddaMemory}} {{Textarea Building}} {{Memory Header}} == Photo Gallery == == Related Links == == Notes == <div class="refere...)
Line 4: Line 4:
{{Location}}
{{Location}}
{{AddaMemory}}
{{AddaMemory}}
-
{{Textarea Building}}
+
{{Textarea Building
 +
|house_intro=A [[wikipedia:Neoclassical_architecture|Classical Revival]]  style entrance identifies this two-story brick building, known as the Masonic Temple.  Engaged fluted Corinthian columns support a classical pediment over the transomed central doorway.  An embossed metal cornice contributes to the overall formality of the entrance.  To the sides of the entrance, glassed storefronts provide access to the first floor shops.  On the second floor five original window bays with stone sills have been felled with brickwork, as have the nine bays on the side facades.  A brick belt course of vertically laid stretches encircles the building.  On the front facade brick pilasters extend from the sides of the entrance’s pediment to a corbelled belt course.  A parapet forms a central pointed gable that incorporates a stone plaque, continuing the centrality of the facade.
 +
}}
{{Memory Header}}
{{Memory Header}}
== Photo Gallery ==
== Photo Gallery ==

Revision as of 18:34, September 19, 2008

Edit with form
State/province: Kentucky



[[Category:Buildings in {{{city-locality}}}, Kentucky]]


A Classical Revival style entrance identifies this two-story brick building, known as the Masonic Temple. Engaged fluted Corinthian columns support a classical pediment over the transomed central doorway. An embossed metal cornice contributes to the overall formality of the entrance. To the sides of the entrance, glassed storefronts provide access to the first floor shops. On the second floor five original window bays with stone sills have been felled with brickwork, as have the nine bays on the side facades. A brick belt course of vertically laid stretches encircles the building. On the front facade brick pilasters extend from the sides of the entrance’s pediment to a corbelled belt course. A parapet forms a central pointed gable that incorporates a stone plaque, continuing the centrality of the facade.

Contents


Memories and stories

Photo Gallery

Related Links

Notes

    Personal tools
    Contribute
    [http://discussions.mnhs.org/HP/oneonone.cfm snubnosed]